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What Is Dogma?

The term "dogma" derives from Greek words meaning "that which seems to one, opinion or belief" and "to think, to suppose, to imagine." It is most often used today to describe "strong opinions held as if they were unquestionable facts".

In religion, dogma is a code of tenents, core principle, organized belief, or value held by a religion, group, or organization. Dogma is a inarguable, undoubted, established opinion or long held belief followed strictly by believers or practioners. Dogma is a fundamental, theologically well demonstrated opinion or belief and the ultimate basis of organized religions like Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.

Dogmata for Catholicism, Eastern Orthodox Christianity, and Oriental Orthodox Christianity are founded in doctrines, like the the Nicene Creed and canons of church councils. Protestants base portions of the dogmata in similar beliefs of Catholicism, Eastern Orthodox Christianity, and Oriental Orthodox Christianity and usually tailor "Statements of Faith" in relation to denomination. Islam's dogmatic principles are based upon the agidah.

The etymologically plural forms of "dogma" include the less frequently used "dogmas" with "dogmata" being the more correct form.

To be dogmatic is to champion opinions as if they were facts that should not be questioned.

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